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Three DACH startups are now part of EIT Health Gold Track Programme

Fast forward to dynamic growth: Smart4Diagnostics and eMurmur receive green light to continue the programme and DegRx is a newcomer to the EIT Health Gold Track programme 

The EIT Health Gold Track is an individualised, milestone-oriented, mentorship programme, designed to help companies achieve ambitious business goals within short timelines. During the one-year program, selected companies work one-on-one with a handpicked mentor, who will provide networking opportunities and advice, and set high-level strategic goals. Up to ten life science, digital health and Medtech companies are invited to pitch their innovative idea in front of the Expert Council and compete for access to a top-notch network, financial support, customised and strategic guidance, and access to a range of programmes from the EIT Health Accelerator Programme. 

At the third Gold Track workshop in Barcelona, held on 6 and 7 February 2020 in Barcelona, the Gold Track Expert Council selected seven promising startups to accelerate, among which the German startup Smart4Diagnostics and the Austrian startup eMurmur were given a green light to continue the process until the next stage, while DegRx was warmly welcomed as a newcomer to the programme. 

Smart4Diagnostics is an EIT Health  WildCard winner working on a digital solution to support the process of blood sampling and to seamlessly record and ensure the quality of the blood sample up to its lab analysis. Just recently the Munich-based MedTech startup announced additional funding of €2.5 million from the new EIC Accelerator. 

eMurmur is a Graz-based MedTech startup which has developed “eMurmur ID”, a mobile and cloud solution which operates in conjunction with a 3rd party electronic stethoscope and it uses advanced machine learning to identify and classify pathologic and innocent heart murmurs, the absence of a heart murmur, and S1, S2 heart sounds. 

DegRx are developing a new therapeutic concept based on what is known as “molecular glue” in order to target disease-causing proteins.